“I Do Not Allow a Woman to Teach”

“The Creation of Eve” by William Blake, circa 1803-05

The Honorable Joseph Turner, youth pastor extraordinaire and reader of this blog, has asked me if I intend to write about women in the church. Well, as a woman in the church myself, one might argue that anything I write at least touches on that subject, but as luck would have it, I was intending to address the topic as the climax of my series of essays on 1 Timothy. The trouble is, I have been attempting to make these posts short, and what I am about to discuss does not lend itself to brevity. The passage is among the most controversial in scripture.

A woman must quietly receive instruction with entire submissiveness. But I do not allow a woman to teach or exercise authority over a man, but to remain quiet. For it was Adam who was first created, and then Eve. And it was not Adam who was deceived, but the woman being deceived, fell into transgression. But women will be preserved through the bearing of children if they continue in faith and love and sanctity with self-restraint.

1 Timothy 2:11-15

I well remember the day that I led a discussion on this passage with a women’s Bible study. The ladies ranged in age from about 25-35, came from various walks of life, and had a basic knowledge of scripture but not a deep, academic sort of understanding. They had evidently not read the verses ahead of time. I spoke the words out loud, then looked up from my Bible to see horrified faces staring back at me. It was as if I had just killed their pet dog. Continue reading

Exploring 1 Timothy – Common Confession

This 13th century illuminated manuscript from Somme le Roy, in the collection of the British Library, depicts the apostles writing the Apostle’s Creed.

What does it mean to confess something? There are two possible answers. Either you are 1) admitting that you did something wrong, or 2) stating that you believe something. Scripture has a lot to say about both subjects, but in the book of 1 Timothy, it is that second definition that is particularly on Paul’s mind. Continue reading

Exploring 1 Timothy – Above Reproach

Statue of Paul outside St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City. Photo by Wikipedia user AngMoKio

When he was writing to Timothy, the Apostle Paul made a point of emphasizing the requirements for becoming an overseer – that is, a pastor or elder.

It is a trustworthy statement: if any man aspires to the office of overseer, it is a fine work he desires to do. An overseer, then, must be above reproach, the husband of one wife, temperate, prudent, respectable, hospitable, able to teach, not addicted to wine or pugnacious, but gentle, peaceable, free from the love of money. He must be one who manages his own household well, keeping his children under control with all dignity (but if a man does not know how to manage his own household, how will he take care of the church of God?), and not a new convert, so that he will not become conceited and fall into the condemnation incurred by the devil. And he must have a good reputation with those outside the church, so that he will not fall into reproach and the snare of the devil.

1 Timothy 3:1-7

Paul lists a number of characteristics that every pastor should have. Rather than discussing every one of them, I would like to focus on the phrase that seems to encapsulate them all: “above reproach”. Not only is this the first requirement Paul mentions, but the importance of every other thing on that list seems to revolve around its relation to the first thing. Clearly, the importance of personal testimony, moral character, and the like is foremost in Paul’s mind when it comes to pastors. Continue reading

Exploring 1 Timothy – The Invisible God

“The Conversion on the Way to Damascus” by Carvaggio, circa 1600. This was the moment when God became visible in more than one way to Saul/Paul.

At one point in his first letter to Timothy, the Apostle Paul breaks into a kind of benediction: “Now to the King eternal, immortal, invisible, the only God, be honor and glory forever and ever.” (1:17) This is a great statement of praise, but what strikes me is the list of attributes he applies to God.

Eternal means He has no beginning or end – He is the creator of time and beyond time. Immortal means He Himself is not created, and He can never not be. But what exactly does it mean that our God is “invisible”? What is Paul getting at here? Continue reading

Exploring 1 Timothy – Sound Words

“Timothy and Lois” by Willem Drost, circa 1650s

In the coming days and weeks, I would like us to take a break from all of this political commentary and dig into a lovely little book of the Bible that has many practical applications for the Church today: 1 Timothy. I intend to bring you a series of essays, hopefully little more than 1,000 words each, that address some of the aspects of this letter that have left the greatest impression on me. Today, we start with the concept of “sound words”. Continue reading